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This post is a load of rubbish…

This is a rubbish picture of a whole load of rubbish. Overall, I think it’s safe to say it’s RUBBISH. But it pleases me immensely. Why?

I’ll tell you why: because this is all rubbish that, until recently, I’d have had to send straight to landfill due to the limitations of kerbside recycling. However, now that I’ve discovered Terracycle, that’s all changed! Their community recycling schemes mean I can take a whole range of waste to various local venues to be recycled. Here we have everything from crisp packets to bread bags to cheese packaging to toothpaste tubes and soap pouches. All stuff that used to go in the bin and can now be recycled: amazing!

All I have to do is sort it out into the categories that are taken within the different schemes, and drop them off at the relevant places highlighted on Terracycle’s handy maps.

Another great thing in the world of recycling is the increasing number of products whose packages state “recycle with bags at larger stores”. Though Terracycle has a specific bread bag recycling scheme, my bread bags get bundled up with cereal packets and various other eligible items to be taken to a supermarket for recycling (but, if I can help it, not before I’ve reused them as sandwich bags or food storage).

So there we have it, a whole new world of reduced waste. It feels good! I’m looking forward to heading out on the bike do drop my sorted waste at various places later. How about you? What new and exciting ways of minimising waste have you discovered lately? I’d love to hear about it – drop me a comment below!

eco friendly products, Plastic Pollution

I wish I’d known this before about recycling…

Back before lockdown, when I was still working in an office on a regular basis, I was really pleased to discover one day that a crisp packet recycling collection box had appeared in the office kitchen (that’s chip packet to those who speak American English!). I started happily collecting packets from home and bringing them in to recycle, happy that it was one less thing going to landfill. A mere few weeks or so later, the pandemic hit and with that my crisp packet recycling dream was over.

Every time I throw something in the general waste, I experience a niggling guilt that I shouldn’t be doing it, despite recycling everything my local authority will take (sadly they don’t een collect food waste in my area, but that’s a conversation for another day!). I’m doing what I can to minimise waste by refilling containers at my local zero waste store, choosing lower-packaging options where possibe ans buying almost only loose produce, but it still doesn’t feel like enough. My curiosity was therefore peaked when I got my hands on a hand soap refill package that read in bright green ‘NEW: recycle me with Terracycle’.

Terracycle, that name rang a bell: it was the company we’d been sending our crisp packets to from the office all those months ago! But how did this service work and how could I make use of it now the office collection was no longer an option? I headed to the Terracycle website to look for answers and was blown away by what I found…

Terracycle runs a huge number of programmes to recycle all sorts of items that won’t be recycled by local councils or other mainstream waste management facilities. Crisp packets and soap packaging aside, there are also programme for cheese wrappers, snack & confectionary packaging, toothbrushes & dental care packaging, games & toys, disinfectant wipes and Marigold gloves… the list goes on! Businesses can also purchase Zero Waste Boxes to recycle packing from items such as arts supplies, baby gear, beauty products, casste & VHS tapes, used gum (!)… again, the list goes on, and importantly in the current era, include disposable PPE items.

The public recycling schemes are free to use, and work on a clever community-based model. Individuals set up drop-off locations by finding a public place to place the collection box, getting permission to do so and signing up with Terracycle do getthings going. Terracycle provide all the gear and the individual ships the waste to Terracycle to do their thing once a suitable quantity has been collected. One everyone has a collection point within a 5-mile radius the scheme is full; otherwise you can set up your own scheme and get collecting. What’s more, partners who have set up a collection earn rewards for waste they return, which can be redeemed as donations to a charity of their choice. Genius!

I’m excited to find that there are collection points nearby for some of my more frequently used items, such as crisp packets, dental care and laundry packaging. Even more so that there could be an opportunity for me to set up a new collection point for other items that aren’t yet accounted for in my local area! I’m going to get the lowdown on what it entails to set up a scheme, but it feels like it could bethe perfect way to do a little bit of good in my community without taking on too much burden. Win-win!

Oh, and Terracycle is operating in over 20 countries worldwide, so it’s not only people in the UK who can benefit! Check out their website to find out more about the programmes, locate your nearby collection points, purchase Zero Waste boxes or set up a scheme. Happy Terracycling!

Plastic Pollution

A Top Tip for Tea-Drinking Types

I was astounded when I discovered, maybe a couple of years ago now, that teabags contain plastic. Once I knew, it seemed obvious – of course they’d disintegrate if they were just paper – but I was shocked at the time. I was also somewhat disturbed by this fact, given the amount of tea that I drink (I am English after all) and how many people throw teabags in their food waste bins. I was immediately on a mission to eradicate teabags from my life.

Loose tea is an obvious answer, and indeed I enjoy the process of selecting different varieties, making and drinking the tea. But sometimes loose-leaf just isn’t practical, you don’t have the time or, if you’re anything like me, you just fancy the type of brew that only comes from an English Breakfast tea bag. Not only is this problematic because of the plastic, but also because most teabags are bleached, which isn’t good for the body either. There must be a better way…

You can imagine my delight when I discovered that Clipper Tea bags are not only unbleached but plastic-free too. What’s more, their Everyday variety is about the tastiest I’ve ever come across – amazing! Oh, and of course it’s Fairtrade too…

Even more happily, it turns out Clipper originated right here in my home county of Dorset. I feel rather proud of that! On writing this post, I worried that it would only be relevant for people living in the UK, but no: Clipper has branched out internationally to over 50 countries, including the United States, Germany, Italy and Japan. So wherever you are, I hope you find yourself able to sample this wonderful English tea, guilt-free.

I invite you to make a brew, sit back, relax and browse the rest of my site. Aaah.